I’ve Always Heard that Music is Universal

We set up on a bridge outside Osaka station and began doing some of the things we’ve already done several times this week. Five minute english and passing out information to interested folks. Charlie Seelen brought his guitar so we could see if people might be drawn to the music and give us a chance to talk.

I was a little hesitant to play and sing because we had tried it last night at America Mura and had little success, but tonight it was different. We did have several people who stopped by to talk with us, but something else has me fired up; I wasn’t the only musician on the bridge. As a matter of fact, as the evening wore on, several came, stationed themselves around and began to play and sing.

We weren’t in competition with each other, but when one of us would stop after a song, the other would play. Me in english, them in Japanese. Every once in a while, I would catch them glancing over my way. They were really quite good.

When it was time for us to leave, I went over to one of the other musicians and gave them several guitar picks with American symbols on them. They in turn gave me their contact information and urged me to get in touch with them when we get back to America. As I waked back over the bridge, I passed other musicians playing a recognized that many of them had come over and listened to us play and sing. They smiled and nodded hello to me. One said “good songs”.

That’s when it occurred to me. If we can get a group of musicians over here it would be powerful. This happens regularly at Osaka station and perhaps in other areas around the city. Music speaks even when the language is different and the Japanese people love music! (Ever hear of Kareoke? They take it to another level entirely here!)

All of you musicians out there, start saving your pennies, I feel another mission trip coming on next Summer! ; )

Advertisements

One Response

  1. As someone who has lived in Japan, your heart to reach a country that is so precious to me makes me hope for the best. The Japanese need relationships, so whatever relationships you can start (and I’ve seen many musicians in Tokyo too!), start them!

    Thank you for caring so much about a country I care about too!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: